Stop the Junk Mail
Login
Stop Wasting Your Time
Join Now! established in 2001

Monthly Archive for March, 2008

Stop Catalog Lands’ End with a Personal Touch

Gidday,

I would like to share with you a note that a member received from Lands’ End this week after requesting a catalog opt out.

A stopthejunkmail.com member received a personal hand written note as follows: “Just a note to let you know we have removed your name from our catalog mailing lists as you requested. Please let us know if we may be of further assistance.” It came hand addressed and in a lovely personal Lands End Note card.

It just goes to show that reducing your unwanted junk mail isn’t such a hard task at all!

Cheerio,
Margot

Authenticating Consumers who wish to Stop Unwanted Catalogs

Gidday,

The DMA says that they collect credit card details to authenticate the consumer who is signing up. The idea is that by using the name and address on the credit card they are confirming the validity of each consumer for their Mail Preference Service suppression list.

The DMA claims that they do not want to send the suppression list with dirty data to their members. Here’s a caveat, the DMA also accept multiple names on one UserID, so how do they verify the secondary names on each account? This means they are only verifying the primary User, or the owner of the credit card? So how many names on the Mail Suppression list have actually been verified?

At www.stopthejunkmail.com we also do verification via the credit card sign up process that consumers use to join our service. Does this mean stopthejunkmail.com can send files to the DMA members? I would think that we can.

What about other services like www.catalogchoice.org who do not take credit card numbers but who are collecting many, many names for opt outs. They have over 110 merchants signed up to accept names via electronic file transfers or other methods. How are the merchants handling these files with the policy the DMA has?

I am finding it hard to understand why the DMA has preference over 3rd parties when in fact they themselves are a 3rd party. Are they not the middle man between the consumer and the catalog companies?

Ahhh! Too many questions!

Cheerio,
Margot