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Daily Archive for September 16th, 2007

Direct Marketers and the DMA Fight Back!


Earlier this week I was referred to an article about the DMA fighting back against the anti-Junk Mail movement. It appears that the DMA is worried that “Do Not Mail” laws may catch on nationally the same way “Do Not Call” did, so the Direct Marketing Association (DMA) and other mailing and fulfillment businesses are fighting back with a lobbying group called Mail Moves America. Mail Moves America intends to head off at the pass the growing number of bills introduced in state legislatures to permit residents to opt out of getting junk mail — or, as the direct mail industry calls it, marketing or advertising — in their mailboxes.

The Article mentions that …”If marketing mail, which DMA says provides more than half the revenue for the U.S. Postal Service, were to be curtailed or eliminated postal rates would soar and delivery may be shortened”… This may be true but most other countries costs of posting a letter is actually more than double that of the USA. Maybe the general consumer would be happy to pay a higher postage in order to reduce their direct mail.

The article also mentioned that the average Household gets 14 pieces of direct mail per week. I find that a low number given’s own quarterly Junk Mail Report indicates at least 20% of households get more like 15-20+ catalogs per week. This does not cover other types of junk mail such as credit card offers, magazines or non-profits. is not out to eliminate direct mail, but we are here to help consumers more clearly define their direct mail preferences. Our service also helps consumers protect their privacy by reducing the number of times their private personal information appears on mailing lists.

In turn we help catalogers more directly market to the groups of individuals who actually want to receive a specific type of direct mail. Why would a direct mailer want to send advertising to a consumer who immediately walks to the recycling bin and discards it. Our quarterly Junk Mail Report shows that nearly 50% of consumers do just this every day.

I for one would like to see an “opt in” approach to direct mail rather than having to “opt out” of everything I don’t want. Let’s put it another way, if a stranger walked into your house and sat down to have dinner with your family, would that be an intrusion of privacy? Usually we invite our guests to dinner, don’t you?